8 Ways To Maximize Your Job Search In December

A New Job For The New Year

Contrary to popular belief, December is a great month to look for your next accounting, finance or banking career opportunity. In her article “Why December Is The Best Time Of Year To Look For Work” published on the Huffington Post, Mary Eileen Williams gives two compelling reasons why this is true:

#1 Competition levels drop dramatically. The majority of job-seekers figure that the holidays are a waste of time and make only marginal efforts to search for a new position. But their unfortunate mistake can turn into your big advantage because…

#2 Hiring takes off in the New Year. Although interviewing for full-time employees takes a dip in December, the months of January and February typically generate the strongest hiring period of the year. Organizations kick-off new projects and initiatives, budgets are put into place and additional staff is required to carry out the company’s plans.

Accordingly, if you take full advantage of the opportunities that the holidays have to offer, you may well find yourself as a sought after candidate–one who’s first in line to be interviewed in early January.

Here Are 8 Ways To Maximize Your Job Search In December:

1. Pick The Right Timing

Focus your job search in the first two weeks of December when companies are still operating as usual.

2. Holiday Networking

Attend as many events, parties and community gatherings as you can. Rather than seeing it as a burden, see it as an added bonus to network with potential employers or people who might provide you with leads. Just remember to keep things social – you don’t want to be handing out your resume at a party. If you have a conversation with someone you think might be helpful to your search, ask for their contact information and follow up later. Feeling a little anxious when it comes to networking? (and who doesn’t!), check our holiday networking tips to make the most of holiday networking.

3. Book An Information Interview

Try to arrange an information interview in December, when most managers have a more relaxed schedule. Even if the company isn’t hiring at the moment, they’re likely planning ahead for next year. If you send in your resume in December or schedule an information interview, you might be the first person they call when a new role comes up.

4. Send Greeting Cards

The holiday season is a great time to send paper or electronic greeting cards to anyone in your network who might be able to help you in your job search and offer a lead. Avoid mentioning your search in the card, but do include your contact information and even your LinkedIn profile URL, so the recipients can circle back after the holidays to catch up.

5. Use Your Holiday Office Party To Your Advantage

Use your own office party to socialize with senior management and make a good impression. Holiday office parties always provide good opportunities to mingle with executives in a more relaxed and casual environment.

6. Stay Close To Home

If you’re actively looking for a new job, don’t take holidays too far from home. You want to keep an open schedule and stay reachable in case a hiring manager or recruiter contacts you to set-up an interview.

7. Be Productive With Your Downtime

Use December’s slower business pace to your advantage. In your downtime, research companies or positions you’re interested in. Review your resume and redraft if necessary, along with updating your LinkedIn profile. Also, work on your interview skills by registering to a webinar or reading articles on the web.

8. Rest up

Last but not least, take a break from your job search during the last week of December when many companies slow down or close for business. Looking for a job is hard work and you’ll need to be well rested when things start to pick up again in January.

Has looking for a job in December paid off for you in the past? We’d love to hear your story.



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